What inspires you?

This may be a little cliché, but whenever I’m struggling or having difficulty—or even when I’m doing well but know that I could do better—the one thing that inspires me is knowing that there is a “future self” of mine out there who is performing at a level that I currently think is impossible, whether mentally or physically. Even now, when I look back, I’m doing things that a year ago, I said, “No way am I going to be able to do that.” Yes, other people in my life inspire me, too; but ultimately, what keeps me going is knowing that I can do better. I believe that for everyone the most inspiring and motivating person in their life should be themselves.

Why are you working in research?

Research combines two interests of mine: understanding human behavior and the way people think, and helping people on a massive scale. Basically, research is listening to people and then putting that info back into the world in a way that is tangible and useful. I’ve always been curious about people, and since I was a child, helping people has always been important to me—anything from donating to volunteering to otherwise being actively involved with others. In college, I thought I was going to become a child development therapist, but then I realized I just didn’t want to wait so long spending 10 years in school before I could make an impact and on just an individual level. So, I got interested in other paths that meld psychology with real-world impact, and that’s when I found market research.

What's something that people are surprised to learn about you?

Something that probably isn’t that easy to pick out about me is that, over the last year or so, I’ve become very zero-waste. It’s a long process, but when I become passionate about something, I focus on it very hard. So, it’s not just about bringing my own grocery bags to the store, but also bringing glass jars to fill up in bulk sections, switching from plastic products to bamboo, bringing my own utensils everywhere, etc. And ultimately, it comes down to believing that, as an individual person, you still have the ability to make a massive impact. If you replace your straws with something reusable, and you use a straw a day, that’s 365 straws that get replaced just by one person. And there’s a ripple effect—I can already see the impact my zero-waste lifestyle has had on my friends and family.

What's one quality you admire in someone else and wish you had more of?

One of the qualities that I really admire in other people that is more of a struggle from my core personality is the ability to make very quick decisions and go with the flow. I like to plan things out, know what the path is, be very organized, and see all different perspectives of something before I make a decision. I can make quick decisions, but it’s definitely very uncomfortable.

Why is being people-first important to you?

The mantra of people first was the first thing I noticed about Bovitz and what really drew me in. Ultimately, what people first means to me is listening to people and really paying attention to what they say. At the end of the day, people’s opinions are what makes the world go ‘round. Taking the time to listen to them and then putting what you learn into action is how you give people what they want.

What's one way that you're the same as your childhood self?

The one thing that has always stayed the same is that I am extremely organized. I’ve always liked planning, lists, color-coding, etc. I can go back to my elementary school days and see lists I wrote down and highlighted in different colors for different things. It seemed like an odd habit to have as a kid, and even I felt it was kind of strange, but the older I got, the more I learned to appreciate it and use it as a benefit for the more goal-driven aspects of my life. Being so organized really gives me a sense of calmness because I know the steps I need to take in order to get somewhere. Putting the overarching goal out there is great, but unless I have my bearings on the steps it takes to get there, that goal is much harder for me to achieve.

What's one thing you love about working at Bovitz?

The culture, which ultimately boils down to the people here. I find that the people here care about you as a whole being, not just another employee. And there are no bad ideas or bad perspectives here, so when we work together, we’re really just building and creating the best idea possible.

Tell me about one of your colleagues.

Jessica has always been really caring and considerate of me as a whole individual. She pays attention when you talk to her, asks questions, and is interested in who you are and what’s going on in your life. She always listens and checks in on you.

What's one aspect of your life philosophy?

Always strive for better, but at the same time, recognize your limitations. You can only do so much based off of what you currently know. It’s almost the human condition where you have to fail at things, learn, and then do something with that and continue to do better. When I lose track of realizing that there is only so much I can do or know without failing, the situation becomes more anxiety-provoking. But then as soon as I realize that, I can see that if I fail, then I can learn something and use that experience to change the situation next time.

What's your idea of the perfect Saturday?

My perfect Saturday would include three things: running or hiking, relaxing at the beach or at home by myself to decompress, and then hanging out with friends at night and just having fun. I don’t really like things that are big and extravagant, so I just need the simple pleasures of being with people I care about and spending time outdoors in the fresh air.

In the Industry:

At Bovitz:

Education:

best quality: